Category Archives: Research & Innovation

Niagara College ranked No. 1 research college in Ontario, No. 2 in Canada

Representatives from the Niagara College Research & Innovation division gather in the courtyard at NC’s Daniel J. Patterson Campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake during the summer of 2022. Read on to see more photos.

For the eighth year in a row, Niagara College ranks among the top 10 colleges in the country for research funding, according to a special report released on January 25.

Niagara College has earned the No. 2 spot in Canada as a top research college, and the No. 1 spot in Ontario. Since Research Infosource Inc. first published its Top 50 Research Colleges report in 2013, NC has been in the top 15 consistently.

In its report, Canada’s Innovation Leaders, Research Infosource Inc. announced the rankings based on total research funding numbers for 2021. The publication includes a national study, “Canada’s Top 50 Research Colleges,” which shows NC’s steady placement in the top 10 for eight consecutive years and among the top 15 for 10 years – including a No. 1 ranking in Canada in 2019.

Brock Husak, Laboratory Technologist with NC’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre, sets up the Fortus 900 3D print machine for an industry partner.

“I am so proud that Niagara College continues to receive recognition as one of Canada’s top 10 colleges for research funding,” said NC president Sean Kennedy. “We are thrilled to earn the second-highest rank in the country and the No. 1 spot in Ontario.

“The expansion of our research and innovation capabilities has been a priority for the College, and today’s announcement is a testament to the important work of our Research & Innovation team to provide real-world solutions for industry and the community through applied research.”

Among colleges with applied research funding in Canada, NC earned the second-highest spot by attracting more than $18.1 million in funding to conduct innovative projects with industry partners in the food and beverage, advanced manufacturing, horticulture and the environment, and business sectors.

NC also moved up one place from last year’s standing to the No. 1 spot, in the category of completed research projects, with a total of 228, while NC’s total number of research partnerships was 190.

“The expansion of our research and innovation capabilities has been a priority for the College, and today’s announcement is a testament to the important work of our Research & Innovation team to provide real-world solutions for industry and the community through applied research.” 
– Sean Kennedy, President, Niagara College

Marc Nantel, PhD, Vice-President, Research, Innovation & Strategic Enterprises at the College, stated that being in the top 10 for the eighth year is a continued source of pride for NC’s Research & Innovation division.

“This announcement is something about which we truly thrilled, and we have to thank the outstanding effort of our staff, faculty, and students who work on projects with industry partners to drive meaningful outcomes,” said Nantel.

Research funding allows the College to partner with small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the region to conduct projects and services, which provide innovative solutions for industry, including producing and testing prototypes, evaluating new technologies, and developing new or improved products and processes. NC Research & Innovation conducts applied research, technical services and business and commercialization solutions with industry partners through its Business & Commercialization Innovation Centre, Food & Beverage Innovation Centre, Horticultural & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre, and Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre.

SoilOptix®, a high-definition top-soil mapping company based in Ontario, uses precision agriculture technology to help farmers understand and improve the distribution of nutrient and texture in their fields. SoilOptix® is now in a position of obtaining global reach with its technology, in part due to their collaboration with the NC research team through precision agriculture, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology and data automation, which created process efficiencies of immense proportions and a user-friendly interface for customers.

SoilOptix® team member drives a cab in the field analyzing the customer portal on a tablet that NC’s HESIC team helped program.

Before working with NC experts, a previous process used by SoilOptix® took a data analyst about eight hours of work. Now, it takes less than an hour, increasing its efficiency by a factor of eight. The NC team is helping to get this down to seconds while expanding the technology and data automation abilities.

The College partnership has enabled the company to grow rapidly in several directions. For example, in 2019, the company was able to map about 110,000 acres; in 2022, it mapped about 500,000 acres, and its 2023 targets are set for approximately 800,000 acres. SoilOptix® has been able to almost double the volume of acres which generate revenue, year-over-year, by a factor of two, or 5.6 per cent growth by month – an uncommon growth pattern for many businesses.

NC graduates are benefitting from the partnership as well. To date, SoilOptix® has hired six graduates right out of school to continue working on the project.

“One of our best kept secrets to our success has been this working relationship with Niagara College. We have found it very rewarding, not only from the sophisticated systems that the student teams have developed, but to the extent of the real-life working opportunities and experiences we have provided for them. The success has been so strong that it has carried to us to the opportunity to hiring several students full-time,” said Paul Raymer, SoilOptix® Co-founder and President.

 


Research Infosource annually compiles listings of the Top 50 research universities, corporate R&D spenders, and research hospitals. This is the seventh year a list has been released for the Top 50 research colleges in Canada. For more information on the Top 50 list, visit researchinfosource.com.

SONAMI team welcomes new Business Development Lead, Mitchell Lutz

Mitchell Lutz, SONAMI's new Business Development Lead.

Mitchell Lutz, SONAMI’s new Business Development Lead.

Mitchell Lutz is the Business Development Lead for the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation (SONAMI), a Niagara College-led consortium of nine academic institutions supporting manufacturers’ research and development needs through applied research projects. In his role, Mitchell is responsible for researching, planning, and implementing new target market initiatives and supporting the recruitment and outreach activities of the network.

Mitchell brings an array of experience in project management, marketing, and business development to the SONAMI team. After spending time growing his franchise business at Enterprise-Rent-A-Car, Mitchell spent the past 5 years as a Training Resource at Canadian Tire Financial Services, helping design and develop blended learning solutions using data and insights aimed towards meeting business objectives.

“I’m most looking forward to helping our team and network members continue to grow and achieve new heights in an overall effort to support local SMEs, advanced manufacturing, and innovation,” said Mitchell.

“Having graduated from Niagara College and through my experience working with different faculty members in the past, I knew the type of atmosphere and culture I could expect from NC would be one of passion, positivity, inclusivity, and a drive to be excellent. Knowing this, along with the opportunity within my current role to help support our local economy, it was an easy decision.”

A proud alumnus, Mitchell holds a Post-Graduate Certificate in Human Resources Management, a Bachelor degree in Business Administration – International Commerce & Global Development, and a Diploma in International Business, all from Niagara College.

“Having graduated from Niagara College and through my experience working with different faculty members in the past, I knew the type of atmosphere and culture I could expect from NC would be one of passion, positivity, inclusivity, and a drive to be excellent. Knowing this, along with the opportunity within my current role to help support our local economy, it was an easy decision,” said Mitchell.

“Everything I expected has been proven correct, and then some. I couldn’t be happier to be a part of this team and it’s in large part due to the amazingly brilliant people I’ve met,” said Lutz.

When not working, he loves to spend time with his family going for walks, playing outside, and playing board games. “Having a 10-year-old stepdaughter, a year-and-a-half old son, and a yorkie keeps me pretty busy, but when I do have some personal time, you can usually find me watching or playing sports, learning about something new, or squeezing in a few minutes of gaming on our Playstation,” he said.

For all business development opportunities with SONAMI, you can reach Mitchell at [email protected] or by phone at 905-735-2211 ext. 7059.

Mark your calendars for OFVC Feb. 22-23

Niagara College’s Research & Innovation team will be exhibiting at booth #628 at the upcoming 2023 Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention, set for Feb. 22 and 23 at the Niagara Falls Convention Centre in Niagara Falls, Ont.

This year, our booth’s theme will be “From seed to table: NC innovation on display” and will feature projects from all four of our Innovation Centres.

The Ontario Fruit and Vegetable Convention (OFVC) is an annual two-day gathering of horticultural crop producers involved in the production of fruits and vegetables. The convention is attended by a cross section of the horticultural sector including government, industry, business, consultants, producers, associations, researchers, and educators from across Canada and features a great lineup of horticultural experts, educational sessions, trade show exhibitors and great networking opportunities.

Variety is the spice of life for Laurie Zuber in her roles at Niagara College

The “average” day simply doesn’t exist for Laurie Zuber, and that’s exactly how she likes it.

One day she can be grading assignments and sending emails to connect with industry leaders, or the next day she can be in the Cannabunker taking clones and harvesting cannabis plants.

Laurie is the Horticulture Technologist for the Commercial Cannabis Production (CCP) program and a part-time faculty member in the School of Environment and Horticulture. She thrives in fast-paced environment and loves working on industry cutting-edge projects alongside her colleagues and the students at Niagara College (NC).

In her role as the Horticulture Technologist, she’s the go-to person behind the scenes of the Cannabunker, keeping it running with the help of her ‘right-hand man,’ Horticulture Technician, Stanley Leggett. She manages all the internal documents, ensures everyone is following Health Canada guidelines, and supports with building out the yearly crop schedule and purchasing of materials to ensure everyone from academics to research have what they need to complete projects.

Another part of Laurie’s job that she enjoys is the close connection to the cannabis industry and the opportunities to represent NC at trade shows and events. “I get to represent the college at different trade shows and its all about making connections with industry,” she says. “I make connections and contacts to help add to our programming, get engaging guest speakers for the students to learn from and connect industry to our expertise to conduct research projects.”

The real value there lies with the students as they get to be on the cutting edge of what’s happening in the cannabis industry, make connections to grow their professional networks, and beef up their resumes by working on these real-world projects.

Laurie has a special connection to the students in the CCP program because she was once in their shoes. A graduate of the inaugural CCP program, Laurie has her mother to thank for introducing her to the program.

“I heard about the program because my mom saw it on the news. She saw that there was this commercial cannabis program happening at NC and she said to me, ‘Hey Laurie, you should take that program!” she recalls.

“At first, I thought, no way. I’m too old to go back to school because at this point I had been working at my job for over 13 years. I had a family, bills, and a busy life. But I thought about it and said you know what? Let’s do it and try to learn a new emerging industry and challenge myself,” she said.

She knew that if this whole new schooling thing didn’t work out, her employer of 13+ years would always take her back, so she went for it, and it paid off.

“I had a great time in the program and learned so much. It was amazing to be one of the first students of the program and thinking ‘Wow, I was actually chosen for this program,’ ” she said.

She met classmates who all had very diverse backgrounds, whether that was from education, work, or hobbies. The inaugural class learned so much from each other and came to understand that the cannabis industry is diverse too. There are so many places you can land or go within the cannabis industry and that was something the whole class found interesting.

“Since we were the first class, it was nice to have a group that wanted to support each other because we didn’t have previous grads to contact and pick their brains about the program. Today, we see lots of students, even before enrolling, reaching out to past grads through social media and they are getting that opportunity to hear first-hand what it’s like, which I love to see,” says Laurie.

Laurie has gotten to where she is today, though, because of her go-getter attitude. “When I was in the program, I basically decided I’m all in! I’m here to be involved in all things cannabis, ready to help and get the most out of my time at NC. So, in my first semester, I worked part-time and learned so much from the professors who were very welcoming and knowledgeable,” says Laurie.

“It’s kind of cool because you get your foot in the door and say, ‘I’m here, I’m available’ and you give yourself that opportunity to move up by putting that initiative forward when you’re a student and it pays off in the long run. Your experience at NC is what you make of it.”

From there, she shadowed the previous horticulture technologist. Since she was super busy, Laurie offered her time and growing expertise to help her in the Cannabunker. That volunteering then turned into another part-time student staff role, and then, after graduating, a role as a part-time horticulture technician.

When the previous technologist decided to move onto a new role, Laurie seized her opportunity, applied for the role, got the job, and hasn’t looked back since.

“It’s kind of cool because you get your foot in the door and say, ‘I’m here, I’m available’ and you give yourself that opportunity to move up by putting that initiative forward when you’re a student and it pays off in the long run. Your experience at NC is what you make of it,” says Laurie.

In her other role now as a part-time faculty member, Laurie really enjoys getting to teach these students and interact with them because you get to see the knowledge being passed on. “I love when you’re teaching a student something and you just kind of see that a-ha moment happen,” says Laurie.

She has a similar passion for research and enjoys working with the Horticultural & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre. “Working with the research team is fantastic because I get to see the best of both worlds, stay up-to-date on the cannabis research and know what products might be coming to the market,” she notes.

And while she loves what she does, in her personal time, you can find Laurie recharging and relaxing in the great outdoors. “I’m an outdoor person, so working in cannabis was a bit of a transition for me because where we grow is in an indoor facility!” she says with a laugh.

But in all seriousness, any chance she gets to go out hiking or golfing, she takes. “When I’m on campus at the Daniel J. Patterson campus in Niagara-on-the-Lake, I always go for a walk during my break to see the escarpment. It’s one of the most beautiful campuses and getting outside is my way to refresh during the workday,” she notes.

Whether its variety in her work life or personal life, Laurie is a testament to trying different things and saying yes to any opportunity that comes her way.

IZC, NC sign MOU formalizing a ‘magic partnership’ to help tackle food insecurity

Building on multiple projects and several years of work together, International Zeolite Corp. (IZ) and Niagara College’s Horticultural & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre (HESIC) have announced a formal agreement that will catapult the research relationship to new heights. Along the way, they plan to contribute to methods of increasing food production and therefore the ability to feed more people.

Under the terms of the agreement, Niagara College will provide priority and support for research projects in relationship to IZ’s proprietary grow system NEREA®, which will be carried out by HESIC. Niagara College will provide ongoing access to resources, staff, and space to support these research projects. The College will also work with IZ to explore prospective advanced manufacturing, business and commercialization projects and alignments, as opportunities may arise. Further, Niagara College will support the efforts of IZ in their establishment of the company’s new production facility in the Niagara region.

You may be asking yourself… how did we get to this exciting point in this partnership? Mark Pearlman, president, and chief operating officer of IZ, can tell you a few stories about this journey.

Several years ago, Mark was vice-chair of the Ontario Food Terminal, and he was investigating the use of zeolite, which is a mineral that’s mined for its water and nutrient holding capabilities, to help with growing when used as a soil amendment.

During that investigation, he was connected with International Zeolite Corp., a company who had a number of partnerships with a group of Cuban scientists who were working with this mineral.

Those researchers and others from the University of Havana developed a proprietary way to embed all the nutrients necessary for plant growth right into the zeolite, a grow system branded as NEREA®.

The Cuban studies demonstrated several benefits to the use of NEREA®, including an increased crop. This meant a) the time to harvest was significantly reduced compared to conventional methods; b) it made for a better quality, larger plant; and c) growers were using significantly less fertilizer than conventional methods.

Mark was amazed by this innovation but knew that the problem was that no one in North America knew about this. He needed a connection in North America to work with to help validate whether the product did exactly what they said it did.

“It’s been an absolutely incredible partnership with the College, because we are able to collaborate with the College to validate our NEREA® grow system, learn from the College about growers and their approach to horticulture, and have a legitimate horticultural research and development group as a ‘branch’ of our team.” – Mark Pearlman, President, and Chief Operating Officer

NC and Mark know that growers are unique; they aren’t going to change the way they grow without understanding that the product they are being asked to use has been fully vetted and validated.

This is where the first connection between Mark (who had begun working with IZ) and Niagara College began. For IZ, the partnership with Niagara College became a priority because they wanted to have strong research to support their product.

“It’s been an absolutely incredible partnership with the College because we are able to collaborate with the College to validate our NEREA® grow system, learn from the College about growers and their approach to agriculture, and have a legitimate agricultural research and development group as a ‘branch’ of our team,” said Pearlman.

The NC team is studying NEREA®, IZ’s propriety on-demand grow system designed for all agricultural sectors: nurseries, greenhouses, horticultural growers, and outdoor growers. It imbeds into zeolite particles all the macronutrients and micronutrients needed by plants to grow effectively and healthy. It is a demand-driven system that allows plants to receive nutrients based on their need and at the time the plant needs it. Proven in Cuban trials and validation studies, the NEREA® grow system decreases crop time, resulting in additional crops for growers thus increasing grower ROI; reduces the overall requirements for fertilizer by up to 80%, resulting in much lower input costs for growers; and reduces greenhouse gases (GHG) significantly through the very reduction of fertilizer consumption.

“Niagara College is recognized as one of Canada’s top research College institutions. They are in the process of evaluating our NEREA® grow system, as well as providing us with recommended solutions supporting rapid adoption of our products and solutions by growers in the horticultural segment. We have gained incredible competitive advantage through our partnership with HESIC. This group takes research and development and makes it practical, and we wouldn’t be where we are without the magic of this unique partnership,” says Pearlman.

For NC, this partnership made perfect sense. “HESIC prides itself on creating strong, impactful research relationships like the one we have with International Zeolite Corp. (IZ). At Niagara College, we provide organizations with research solutions that help to evaluate innovations and move their products toward commercialization. We’re excited to continue our partnership with IZ, and this new agreement will enable even more innovative research,” says Kimberley Cathline, HESIC research program manager.

With this MOU in place, IZ is ramping things up. Plans are ongoing to open a manufacturing facility in Niagara, commercialize and begin product development and production. “This is a unique paradigm shift. We’re asking growers to adopt a new growing methodology because we have a growing system that can significantly help them. It can help reduce greenhouse gases, increase yields, and reduce their costs. And we can’t wait to get this product on the market,” said Pearlman.

Not to mention, IZ always has its eye on the impressive students who are graduating from horticulture and greenhouse programs at the College. “We have a goal to take students from NC programs and hire them to work for IZ to become our next leaders to help us bring NEREA® to market over the next several years,” said Pearlman.

This partnership is a win-win-win. It benefits IZ, allows the College to conduct important research, and allows students the experience to work on client projects that have real-world prospective job opportunities. And Pearlman’s hope is that this partnership will help validate a product that is going to help growers grow more fruit and vegetables, and therefore feed more people around the world.

SoilOptix® attaining global reach thanks in part to collaboration with NC research team

SoilOptix®, a high-definition top-soil mapping company in Ontario, uses precision agriculture technology to help farmers understand and improve the distribution of nutrient and texture in their fields.

SoilOptix® is now in a position of obtaining global reach with their technology, in part due to their collaboration with the NC research team through precision agriculture, GIS tech and data automation, which created process efficiencies of immense proportions and a user-friendly interface for customers.

The Tavistock company came to Niagara College’s Research & Innovation (R&I) division in 2017 as an industry partner needing support on an applied research project. One project with the Horticultural & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre (HESIC) has evolved into a long-standing collaboration that benefits SoilOptix®, NC students, and the greater agriculture industry.

SoilOptix® provides soil-mapping technology to farmers, giving them a deeper understanding of the variability in fertility and textural-based properties of their soil. SoilOptix® produces amazingly detailed, high-definition soil-mapping sensors (licensed under an exclusive arrangement with the Medusa Institute in the Netherlands) that can accurately map over 25 different topsoil layers, including macro- and micro-nutrients, pH, organic matter, physical properties, texture, plant available water, and carbon.

With a resolution of 335 points per acre and data that is easily implemented into variable-rate applications, SoilOptix® gives growers a deeper understanding of the variability in nutrients and textural-based properties of their field’s soil, which results in better optimization of input (fertilizer, seed, etc.) placement for economic and environmental gain.

However, this thorough data analysis and processing work uses multiple pieces of software and was taking a significant amount of time, creating a bottleneck in service.

The HESIC team, led by Mike Duncan, PhD, the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council Industrial Research Chair for Colleges in Precision Agriculture & Environmental Technologies, streamlined the data process and programmed the primary production into a single, efficient system. The User Interface (UI) makes this process much faster by automating much of the work. With the UI, the SoilOptix® data analysts are realizing an eight-fold increase in their ability to process a field.

In addition, the next piece of the collaboration has NC students working on two components for SoilOptix®. The first is a fully automated process that has a new improved system that will continue to improve any bottlenecks and have far less issues in terms of data access. Secondly, NC students are working on an external interface for customers use – a customer portal where they can log in and grab their data and interact with the company.

Students who have an opportunity to work on a SoilOptix® project with HESIC have received first-hand, real-world experience, which helps them become innovative, forward-thinking employees who in several cases have been hired with the company. Alternatively, wherever they end up, if it’s creating their own company or working for industry, they are innovators and have a leg up on their competition when entering the work force.

Students can learn about new software, which challenges them and applies what they are learning in the classroom to an industry partner’s real-world challenges. This type of student work experience, with true budgets, deadlines, and deliverables, is what makes their learning innovative and beyond in-classroom learning alone.

The real value of this project is that leaders such as SoilOptix® co-founder and President Paul Raymer and the rest of his leadership team understand the value of always trying to improve.

Paul’s team was able to identify the gap in their resources, which was technology and data automation. They connected with the HESIC team to work on a data processing portal and have been working together in an ongoing capacity since.

“One of our best-kept secrets to our success has been this working relationship with Niagara College’s Horticultural & Environmental Sciences Innovation Centre. … The success has been so strong that it has carried through to the opportunity to hiring several students full-time.”
– Paul Raymer, SoilOptix® co-founder and president

Once joining the HESIC team, students are taken under Mike’s wing. He patiently trains the students as research assistants and supports them when they eventually become graduates working in their respective fields. Mike is always proud when another NC grad is hired to join the SoilOptix® team, because he knows the former student will understand their business model and how to make the company successful.

“It’s been a real pleasure for me to get to work so closely with the SoilOptix® team, and most importantly our NC students. Getting to see these students join the project with basic knowledge and then grow to become near experts in their field is amazing,” says Mike.

The software that the students learn to build these systems are often new to them when they start.  The mentoring that senior students provide to junior students is an understanding of the structure and tools. They begin to grow on their own and explore the various components of the system.

“After about six months of working through simple bug fixing and modifications to the existing system, they generally get an idea of where they might fit in the project and we accommodate their interests and assign them to an area where they are most comfortable and likely to be productive,” notes Mike.

When they graduate and begin working, they already know where they can be most effective. “We’re constantly watching and looking to take advantage of a student’s abilities to put them in the right place to move the (SoilOptix®) project forward as fast as possible.”

His focus is to enable students to work on projects where they are going to learn and grow and become a better student and eventually, working professional. He encourages the more senior Research Assistants to help teach, challenge, and grow the new students’ skills and knowledge, which gives the senior students a leadership role within the team. He also stresses the importance of communication and being able to speak the proper technological language when it comes to client engagement.

Another key leadership piece is that the SoilOptix® leadership team is always agile and willing to put the time and resources into the project with Niagara College to ensure their product is always getting better and better. They increasingly invest in the people and expertise required to get the business where it is today.

“One of our best-kept secrets to our success has been this working relationship with Niagara College. We have found it very rewarding, not only from the sophisticated systems that the student teams have developed, but to the extent of the real-life working opportunities and experiences we have provided them. The success has been so strong that it has carried through to the opportunity to hiring several students full-time,” says Paul.

The collaboration allows students the opportunity to gain real-world experience while still in school.

Before working with HESIC’s experts, SoilOptix®’s previous process took a data analyst about eight hours of work. Now, it takes less than an hour, increasing their efficiency by a factor of eight. The HESIC team is helping to get this down to seconds while expanding the technology and data automation abilities. The College partnership has enabled the company to grow rapidly in several directions. For example, in 2019, they were able to map about 110,000 acres; in 2022, they increased that to over 500,000 acres, with 2023 targets set at approximately 800,000 acres. SoilOptix® has been able to double the company year-over-year by a factor of two, or 5.6 per cent growth by month – an uncommon growth pattern for many businesses.

Soil Optix worker in field

Growing on an international scale

The collaboration between SoilOptix® and HESIC started locally in Ontario, but now has sustainability impacts with an international reach. 

Further, this technology development and company growth means the process will be made available beyond Canada, adding major crop-growing regions internationally. A new partnership between Hutchinsons and Syngenta now makes the SoilOptix® system available under the Interra® Scan brand across 51 countries in Europe. The rollout of Interra® Scan SoilOptix® sensors will begin in Eastern Europe with Ukraine and Poland and gradually move into western Europe over the next several years.

Rising costs and tight margins, combined with growing societal pressure around sustainability, mean it’s more important than ever to give the soil what it needs by applying inputs precisely and accurately. This is what makes the technology and data automation projects in this collaboration so important.

Beyond NC graduates directly benefitting (6 have been hired by SoilOptix® so far), the College continues to benefit as well, securing direct funds from SoilOptix® in a 5-year agreement worth $50,000 per year, to have the HESIC team continue working on the above-noted improvements. This allows more students to become experienced grads ready to tackle the agricultural challenges of food supply issues of the future.

The future of this project is automation. The team will be using a mixed bag of technologies, including Artificial Intelligence, to automate as closely as possible the current map making methods that SoilOptix® analysts use. While it will be a challenge, the team is getting very close.

The benefit is at least a thousand-fold increase in the rate of production of maps (hours to seconds). Once automated, the process will be run in parallel so that they can scale the map-making rate to hundreds of maps being created simultaneously.

“This increased capacity will give SoilOptix® the potential to grow exponentially as the market demands,” says Mike.

No doubt, the future for SoilOptix® and Niagara College is an exciting one.