Category Archives: Where Are They Now?

Mechanical engineering grad never stops learning

Mike Granton is a 2017 graduate of Niagara College’s Mechanical Engineering Technologist program. He did his co-op with the Research & Innovation division’s Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre as a research assistant and was then hired as research associate after graduating. He also graduated from NC’s Computer Engineering Technology/Technician program in 2003. Mike is employed with Grimsby-based Jantz Canada as a mechanical designer.

Tell us about where you work:
I work for Jantz Canada in Grimsby, Ontario. We design and build conveyors, automation and robotics systems, with a focus on the food industry.

Describe your role and what you like about it:
The bulk of my job involves design work, whether it be modifications and improvements to existing systems, or brand-new designs from the ground up. I’m responsible for creating drawings for our manufacturing department and ensuring they have all the information required to build our equipment efficiently. I create and manage bills of materials for projects in order to keep track of all purchased parts and outside work required to get a project done on time. I conduct research into new technologies relevant to our industry. And, I am involved in prototype design, testing and reporting.

How has your experience with Research & Innovation helped prepare you for your current role?
My Research & Innovation experience has helped me in several ways. The research portion of the projects I was involved in taught me how to seek out relevant and useful information in order to solve a problem.

This is something I do on a daily basis and it is an invaluable tool in my current job. Another important part of my experience was my involvement in the project management and planning phases of each project. I still use similar time management guidelines that I learned at R&I to budget my time across multiple projects.

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?
One of my most memorable research projects was the motorized window cleaning brush I designed. This was my first project at R&I. What made this project so memorable was the feeling of accomplishment after seeing through my design from research stage to finished working prototype. I still feel that same kind of accomplishment today, but this project in particular made it clear that I had made the right decision to enroll in the Mechanical Engineering Technologist program.

“Seeing my first original design – a 20-ft-tall conveyor, fully assembled in our shop and reaching to the ceiling – was a great feeling that filled me with a lot of pride.”

You were already a Niagara College graduate; what led you back?
I remember seeing an article in the paper about a road-paving machine that was designed by students at Niagara College in the Research Department. At the time, I just thought it was neat to see that kind of work being done at the college. A year or two later I found myself wanting a change in career and I remembered that article and I thought it would be a great experience to be part of a similar type project. That’s what ultimately drove my decision to go to NC.

Most memorable experience at NC?
My most memorable experiences at NC would be the opportunities to speak in front of politicians and members of the press as a representative of Niagara College and Research & Innovation. These experiences brought me out of my comfort zone and allowed me to develop my public speaking skills and generally make me more open to experiences I would have avoided in the past.

Mike Granton, then an NC Mechanical Engineering student and research assistant with WAMIC, gets the chance to speak at the funding announcement of the Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation (SONAMI) by the Federal Economic Development Agency for Southern Ontario (FedDev Ontario) in 2016.

A faculty member who influenced you?
One particular faculty member that influenced me was Costa Aza. He played a big part in my decision to apply at R&I before my first co-op term was about to start. His enthusiasm and interest in new technologies and methods related to mechanical engineering piqued my interest in the types of projects being done at R&I.

The majority of the projects I worked on at R&I were also led by Costa. He was always encouraging and allowed me to take the lead in terms of design choices and the general direction of a project while still providing enough leadership to help me avoid mistakes and poor choices.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?
Never stop learning. Your education doesn’t end once you graduate and begin your career. In fact, it’s only just beginning.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?
One of the main things I’ve learned is to have respect and learn from the experience of my colleagues. There have been many times where I’ve been able to solve a problem or avoid a costly mistake by simply getting the input and advice from others.

Proudest achievement since graduating?
Seeing my first original design – a 20-ft-tall conveyor, fully assembled in our shop and reaching to the ceiling – was a great feeling that filled me with a lot of pride. It was my first real project at Jantz that I worked on from start to finish.

Interests outside of work?
Most of my interests outside of work revolve around music in some way. Whether I’m playing guitar or drums or restoring old tube guitar amps.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?
It’s never too late for a change!

Anything else you want to say?
Leaving a steady career to go back to school and start fresh was a scary experience at first. I knew if I stuck to it and worked hard, it would ultimately turn into a good experience. But I had no idea how great of an experience it would turn out to be. I met and worked with so many great people at Research & Innovation and the College in general. I’m proud to have been a part of the team at R&I and the work that we did. I wouldn’t have changed a thing about my experience at Niagara College and Research & Innovation.

To learn more about the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre and its capabilities, click HERE.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Rachel Gerroir

Rachel Gerroir is a 2019 graduate of Niagara College’s Culinary Innovation & Food Technology program and spent two years with the Research & Innovation division, first as a Research Assistant, then Research Associate with the Canadian Food & Wine Institute (CFWI) Innovation Centre. Rachel is now employed as a Research Assistant with the Cool Climate Oenology and Viticulture Institute (CCOVI) at Brock University.

Tell us about where you work:
CCOVI is an internationally recognized institute focused on research priorities for Canada’s grape and wine industry, while also offering education and outreach programs for that community.

Describe your role and what you like about it:
My job involves working alongside researchers and graduate students on research projects aimed to help industry in various aspects of grape growing and winemaking. One of the projects I work on involves going to local vineyards to sample grapes and analyze the tannin concentration of the skins and seeds on a weekly basis until they are harvested.

The objective is to create a historical database of tannin development in many different varietals throughout the harvest season in Niagara’s wine region. This will facilitate best tannin management practices and informed decision-making throughout the winemaking process. I enjoy being able to go out into the field, and I’ve even had the chance to help with a harvest, which was a completely new experience for me!

How has your experience with Research & Innovation helped prepare you for your current role?
Research & Innovation was a fantastic learning environment and a great place to interact with clients and work on real products. I was able to see the challenges that small- and medium-sized businesses were facing and find the best solution for them. The hands-on lab experience and knowledge of various pieces of laboratory equipment have been most influential in preparing me for my current role. Working on many different projects simultaneously also helped me learn to organize and prioritize my time efficiently.

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?
Sobrii non-alcoholic gin beverage was a product I worked on in my final year at Research & Innovation. It was great to be able to work on a product that’s the first of its kind in Canada and be able to try competitive products from all over the world. I learned how to manage a project from start to finish. This included sourcing ingredients, macerating botanicals and distilling, organizing tastings, and adjusting the product to meet client expectations. It all started with small lab-scale distillations and ended with running commercial scale-ups at the Niagara College Teaching Distillery.

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?
The practical, hands-on approach to learning where you could take what you’ve learned in the classroom and apply it to what you do in the science labs or kitchens. Coming from university, I also appreciated the smaller class sizes as they allowed you to dig deeper and ask more specific questions related to course material.

“The hands-on lab experience and knowledge of various pieces of laboratory equipment have been most important in preparing me for my current role.”

Most memorable experience at NC?
The culinary labs were some of my favourite courses because they brought food science into a practical environment while allowing you to use your creativity. Bringing home all the delicious food wasn’t so bad either!

A faculty member who influenced you?
Many members of faculty influenced me positively over the three years, especially Peter Rod, for sparking my interest in wine, and Dr. Amy Proulx for her ongoing encouragement and motivational support.

A mentor at R&I?
I learned something from many members of the research team, whether it be teachings through the product development process, how to use pieces of lab equipment, to how to manage expectations in the workplace. It was a great learning environment.

What advice would you impart to current research students or future alumni?
Work hard and be open to projects of all sorts; there’s something to learn in every one of them.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?
To keep an open mind and be willing to participate in new experiences. If you have the opportunity to learn something new, always take it.

Proudest achievement since graduating?
Learning something new and building on my experience every day in a challenging and rewarding environment.

Interests outside of work?
Baking, hiking the beautiful trails of the Niagara region, visiting local wineries, and travelling.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?
It’s the will, not the skill.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Alex Davis

Alex Davis is a 2017 graduate of Niagara College’s Computer Programmer Analyst program. With the Research & Innovation division, he served as Research Assistant from 2016 to 2017 and then Research Associate until July 2019. Alex is now employed as a Software Developer at Landlord Web Solutions in Thorold.

Tell us about where you work:

Landlord Web Solutions (LWS) offers online marketing and data services for the rental housing community. The company builds rental housing websites in Canada and manages advertising syndication for many of the country’s largest property management firms. LWS is also host to one of the largest rental housing conferences (WEBCON) in North America.

Describe your role within the company:

As a Software Developer I develop new web-based products and provide support for LWS’s innovative content management system platform. There are many opportunities to learn as LWS actively seeks to explore new technologies to benefit their clients.

How has your Research & Innovation experience helped you prepare for your current role?

My experience at R&I has given me the ability to research and understand emerging technologies, work in a heavily team-based environment, learn from peers, and be more independently motivated.

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

The sensor blanket project with Studio 1 Labs. [Studio 1 developed an “intelligent” bedsheet that automates routine respiratory patient monitoring for healthcare workers, without the use of cumbersome wires. Niagara College’s Digital Media & Web Solutions team developed an intuitive, aesthetically pleasing user interface for the fabric-sensing technology.]

In my role, I researched new technologies and various solutions to process and present high volumes of data through a web interface; and fostered client relationships through ongoing communication. I was able to present and see our work in action at the 2017 IBM Disruption conference and at Parliament Hill.

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

I wanted to develop a skillset to begin and grow a career. Niagara College was the way to go.

Most memorable experience at NC?

Working with R&I, of course!

A faculty member who influenced you?

Everyone – Marsha Baddeley, Dave Kendall, Dave Stovell, Melissa Vanderlely, Peter Vanscoy, Cliff Patrick, James Marks. All of the CPA faculty have contributed to my growth as a young professional.

“My experience there has given me the ability to research and understand emerging technologies, work in a heavily team-based environment, learn from peers, and be more independently motivated.”

A mentor at R&I?

Neil Wilkinson, Gregor MacLean, Mike Duncan, Kimberley Cathline, Carolyn Mullin, Tanya Hvilivitzky, Gord Maretzki, Christine Raymond, Al Spence, and all the staff at Research. You all are what made R&I so special.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Take the time to learn and absorb all the knowledge and technical skills you can. Take initiative and don’t be afraid of failing.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

Every office needs a good coffee maker.

Proudest achievement since graduating?

Getting a salary gig! 

What are your interests outside of work?

Spending time with my wife and our dogs.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

“No matter what you do, you will always be better than Game of Thrones Season 8.”

Anything else you want to say?

Tell everyone I say Hi!

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where are they now?: Jason Wright

Jason Wright is a 2018 graduate of Niagara College’s Mechanical Engineering Technology (Co-op) program and was a Technical Services Research Assistant at the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre for the Research & Innovation division for one year. Jason has been employed with Burloak Technologies in Oakville as a Process Designer since November 2018.

Tell us about where you work:

Burloak Technologies is a leading partner for advanced additive manufacturing solutions. The company uses additive manufacturing with a variety of metals and plastics, and multi-axis machining to serve the aerospace, satellite communications, spaceflight, energy and high-end industrial sectors.

Describe your role and what you like about it:

As a Process Designer, it is my responsibility to get Burloak to define company processes around DfAM (design for additive manufacturing, operation of additive manufacturing equipment, and manufacturing of advanced manufacturing parts. I am creating documentation to support our processes and support traceability to our customers, and support the engineering team with any new projects that come along. Some days I am at my desk, and other days I am on the manufacturing floor either making something or helping to solve problems. My favourite part of the job is that every day is different, and everyone at Burloak shares the same passion: leading the advancement of additive manufacturing technology in Canada and across the globe.

How has your experience with Research & Innovation helped prepare you for your current role?

R&I gave me the additive manufacturing background that my company was looking for, which helped me to land this job.  I also had the opportunity at R&I to speak with customers, and turn their conceptual ideas into 3D models, and eventually into printed parts. The research, design, and communication skills I learned at R&I are skills I use every day at work. 

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

In 2017, I worked with a company developing a product that required significant product design, and additive manufacturing for rapid prototyping purposes. The most memorable work I was a part of at R&I was working with the Fortus (3D printing) production systems (FDM Additive) and design projects.  The technology is very advanced, I always looked forward to going to work at R&I to see what the Fortus had finished printing the night before.

Most memorable experience at NC?

The most memorable experiences at NC were with my friends that I met in the program. The Mechanical Engineering Technology program at NC is very demanding and very rewarding. I lived with a few of my classmates, and we became close friends. The most memorable experiences were pulling long nights and early mornings studying and completing projects with my friends. It was a huge challenge and we all supported each other.

“The research, design, and communication skills I learned at R&I are skills I use every day at work.”

A faculty member who influenced you?

All of my professors were greatly influential, and helped me to develop strong interests in the classes they taught. 

Lois Johnson instilled in me a strong interest in material sciences; her classes were the most interesting to me. I plan to work towards a career in material sciences within the additive manufacturing industry.

Neil Walker has such a distinct passion for his courses and his students. He could explain the same concept a thousand different ways until everyone understood it. He really helped to connect the dots between the applicable engineering concepts and the math.

Scott Phillips really wants to exercise your mind. He might give you a problem, almost like an engineering puzzle, and give you 50 percent of the jigsaw pieces. It is your job to find the other 50 percent using any resources possible, with no hints. This was often frustrating, but I tried hard to solve those puzzles. I strongly believe his lessons contributed the most to my flexibility and problem-solving skills that I use every day now.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Take time to learn from your colleagues at R&I. Even if it isn’t a project you are directly working on, you can learn so much just from asking questions and being interested. This opens up the opportunity to be a part of multiple projects at once, which is both a great learning opportunity and can be a lot of fun.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

Entering the workforce can be intimidating and nerve-racking, but that’s where you are going to learn about your own strengths and weaknesses. It is humbling to enter a place where your knowledge is not judged on an even playing field, and it is certainly rewarding to learn new things about yourself. I quickly learned what my strengths are in terms of project management and the application of knowledge through technical writing. I also learned where I needed to improve. Keep your mind open and remember, you don’t know everything yet.  

What are your interests outside of work?

 I enjoy spending time outside, whether that means going for a hike, cycling, or reading a book by the lake. Working indoors all day can take a lot out of you – spend some time outside!

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Web developer with eye for design gets start at NC

Brontë Bean is a 2016 graduate of Niagara College’s New Media Web Design program and was a Web Design/Developer Research Assistant for the Research & Innovation division for eight months. Brontë is employed with design agency Redstamp as an Intermediate Front End Developer.

Tell us about where you work:

My current employer is Redstamp. They are a full-service agency based in Port Moody, British Columbia specializing in creative design, technical development, and digital marketing, and emphasize automation and innovation to help drive growth.

Describe your role and what you like about it:

My role is Intermediate Front End Developer. I started in October of 2017 just after I moved to British Columbia. In May of 2018, I moved back to Ontario and have continued to work with Redstamp as a full-time remote employee.

My job is primarily developing websites using WordPress as a CMS [Content Management System]. I work with a team of developers and together we provide clients with different web solutions, ranging from marketing emails, and microsites, to web apps. We have a lot of great clients; many coming from tech backgrounds which makes projects innovative and fun to work on.  Our team is currently in the middle of creating a dynamic design system in Gutenberg, Germany.

How has your experience with Research & Innovation helped prepare you for your current role?

R&I helped accelerate my career. Before graduating, I was offered a job in my field and I credit a lot of that to the skills I learned at Research & Innovation. It gave me a taste of the industry and what typical processes may be like. I was meeting with clients, creating mockups and developing websites. I use those same core skills today at my current job.

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

I was able to work on a project with Niagara Sustainability while at R&I. They were a great team and it was interesting to learn all about what they do for the area. I started with creating designs, which turned into a fully functional WordPress site. It appears that they are still using much of what I worked on with R&I.

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

I liked the idea of being at a smaller school. I toured several colleges in the area but felt I would have just been another number. I wanted to be a big fish in a small pond. Niagara College offered small class sizes with hands-on learning. Niagara also offered several opportunities to get involved in the community and work with local professionals in the same field. Through those connections and experiences, I was able to get a job upon graduating.

“Before graduating, I was offered a job in my field and I credit a lot of that to the skills I learned at Research & Innovation. It gave me a taste of the industry and what typical processes may be like.”


Most memorable experience at NC?

There are too many memorable experiences to choose just one. I met many great people at NC with whom I made many amazing memories.

A faculty member who influenced you?

I was very lucky to work with some amazing faculty. I learned a lot from my teacher and R&I mentor Mark Hardwick. He would take the time to sit one-on-one with me to work out any design or development question I had. Looking back, a lot of the core knowledge I have about the industry comes from Mark.

A mentor at R&I?

Neil Wilkinson [Project Manager] was also a great mentor. He approached all projects with a positive attitude and made sure we had what we needed to succeed. Even recently, I have seen him engage with past R&I employees on platforms like LinkedIn for potential job opportunities.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Have fun. Although this is work, be sure you truly like what you’re doing. Take your time learning the basics as these will be essential to your career and future learning. I started making WordPress sites while at R&I and I am still using those same skills today.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

The last few years have been a whirlwind of knowledge and learning. My advice would be to take things one step at a time. Learn the basics before getting into more advanced topics. I have also learned the importance of a team – everyone brings something different to the table so try to use that to your advantage to widen your skillset.

Proudest achievement since graduating?

I am very proud of how far I have progressed in my career and the work I have produced in the last few years. I have gained a wide range of knowledge and skills throughout my experience working in an agency environment.

Interests outside of work?

I spend most days on the computer so outside of work I like to enjoy the outdoors – activities include hiking with my two dogs, kayaking at a nearby lake, or spending the weekend away camping. I also enjoy arts and crafts and going to flea markets or thrift stores to add to my multiple collections of things.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

“You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take!” ~ Wayne Gretzky

Anything else you want to say?

Thanks to both R&I and Niagara College for all the amazing opportunities I was given. I learned many valuable lessons and continue to use them in my everyday life.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Rafael Almeida on his strategy for life

Rafael Almeida
Niagara College Computer Programming student Rafael Almeida working on a project as a Research Assistant in the labs at the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre.

The Niagara region has a particularly sentimental meaning for Rafael Almeida. When searching for a Canadian school to enrol in computer programming, it was the beauty of this region that reminded him of his honeymoon locale in his home country of Brazil.

While it may not seem a likely comparison given the tropical South American climate, the southern tourist town of Gramado is a scenic four-season destination, with an array of food, culture, wine … and snow.

“Niagara really got to my heart because of the memories from my honeymoon,” says Rafael, a Research Assistant with the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre at Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division. “Then when I learned about what Niagara College had to offer for me, everything was a perfect match.”

His quest to further develop his specialized knowledge in information systems was just part of a bigger plan. In leaving the political and economic upheaval of Brazil, he and his wife also wanted to make a better life for their young daughter.

With a Bachelor’s degree in information systems and post-graduate education in IT Management, Rafael spent 15 years working for one of Latin America’s largest software companies. And while he had a comfortable financial footing back home, he knew that his education needed to be broadened to have security for the future.

“It was not only specialized, and a proprietary language that I was experienced in, it was very old technology,” he explains. “If they suddenly closed, I would be in trouble … it’s not a programming language that could be transferred easily.”

“In my job in Brazil I would never have the opportunity to work with lasers. Here, I have real-world problems that I’m solving with my knowledge – my college knowledge and my past business knowledge.”

Since arriving in 2018, Rafael’s strategy has been to work extremely hard at his grades, provide for his family, learn the language and give back when he can. To date, he has earned near-perfect grades in his first two terms, holds down two jobs, he’s nearly fluent in English, and peer mentors, and tutors other international students.

At 35, Rafael has the maturity to understand the importance of all his actions.

“I knew that it would be hard mentally and financially, but it’s all part of the strategy. I came here with this in my mind,” he says. “I had to be the best one in class and get as much knowledge as I can. I need to make it work. I need to do whatever I have time to in order to hopefully establish here.”

He realized it was going to be a challenging schedule, leaving little time to spend with his wife Priscila and five-year-old daughter Alice, given his school work, his R&I position and a part-time job at Walmart near his St. Catharines’ home. “That’s the only thing that makes me a little sad. But we all know it’s temporary and it’s good for our future.”

Since starting with Research & Innovation earlier this summer, Rafael has had the opportunity to work on projects he never dreamed possible – lasers, 3D printers, Internet of Things (IoT), Artificial Intelligence and more.  

His first assignment was helping his team with a project for industry partner Speed Composites, who had invented a product to provide precise measurements and optimum adjustments of a race car’s chassis prior to a race, and wirelessly transmit the data to an app. The company needed help building the electronics and programming the software/firmware.

Rafael was brought on board to help troubleshoot issues with the laser measurement sensor. He soon discovered that various surfaces made differences with the measurements and his team was able to adjust the sensors.

“In my job in Brazil I would never have the opportunity to work with lasers,” he says. “Here, I have real-world problems that I’m solving with my knowledge – my college knowledge and my past business knowledge.”

As well, with his expertise in process management software in fields such as logistics, manufacturing, and financial services, he has been putting his experience to good use in helping to revamp the R&I platform work management software, Tracksuite.

“The experience I’m gaining will definitely make a difference on my resume.”

Student Rafael Almeida speaking about his Research & Innovation experience at the funding announcement for SONAMI (Southern Ontario Network for Advanced Manufacturing Innovation). See below for video.

Rafael understands that his current experiences will shape his future. So, when he was invited by R&I staff to be the student representative guest speaker at a $14-million funding announcement by the federal government to Niagara College, he knew he could not pass up the opportunity, even if he was hesitant to speak in front of a group of dignitaries in his second language.

“I was told the federal Minister of Infrastructure and Communities would be there, and I was like, ‘for all of Canada?’” he jokes. “But I’m pretty sure this is going to help me in the future. The videos and photos of that day will definitely be part of my portfolio.”

For every milestone so far in the region that’s so close to his heart, he is grateful. “It’s been very good for us here,” he says. “For my daughter, she’s learning things and having opportunities that she didn’t have. Brazil is a good country with good people, but here in Canada we have opportunities that we wouldn’t have there, mainly for our daughter.”

Upon graduation, Rafael says his plan is to apply for a post-graduate work permit with the hope of staying in Canada another three years.

In the meantime, he continues to find time to mentor other international students who may be struggling to adapt to the region or their academics. 

“It’s always good to help others achieve success,” he adds. “We are more than only ourselves in this life. If at the end of the day you make someone feel better about themselves, I call it a good day.”

 

To learn more about the work of the Walker Advanced Manufacturing Innovation Centre, visit the web page.