Category Archives: Where Are They Now?

Where Are They Now?: Jonathan Pinchbeck

 

Jonathan Pinchbeck, C.E.T. is a 2013 graduate of Niagara College’s Mechanical Engineering Technology program and spent one year with Research & Innovation as a Research Assistant. Since April 2018, Jonathan has headed up the R&D at Deville Technologies in Ville St. Laurent, Quebec, a designer of high-capacity industrial food cutting systems. 

Tell us about where you work:

Currently, I’m working for Deville Technologies in Ville St-Laurent, QC near Montreal. It is a Canadian company more than 25-years strong. The company designs and sells automated high-capacity industrial food cutting systems (shredding, grating, portioning, dicing, secondary dosing, conveyance) at rates of up to six tons/hr per process line (some clients have multiple lines). Our client base is in Canada, US and Europe for a variety of products (dairy, fruit and vegetable, meats).

Describe your role and what you like about it:

As Deville’s R&D Technologist, I’m mainly responsible for researching, designing, and testing prototype machinery. I also help grow the department (currently two people: lab tech and myself), curate and build intellectual property, manage progress of R&D projects, help to increase our testing capability, investigate new components and building materials, develop pilot plants and processes, test rig design and automation, as well as help manage the tax credit process.

We’ve currently launched a machine to market that can successfully shred Edam cheese at high rates. I was directly involved in the shred chamber design and performance analysis of the machine. I also helped develop some new testing equipment to analyze force and friction in real time. I’ve got a few game changer technologies on the go right now that aren’t market ready yet. Still hush-hush. 

Please give us an idea of what types of related things you’ve been doing since graduating.

My first job after graduating was working as a machine designer for a company in hydraulics and pneumatics and later as a junior project manager. Then I worked as an R&D Tech, Junior and then Senior Project Lead over a three-year period, driving projects to improve, develop, manufacture, and maintain commercial-scale rotisserie ovens used at major grocery deli counters worldwide. Then after working as a Manufacturing Specialist at an architectural LED lighting company for a year I was approached by a headhunter working for Deville and it was a perfect fit.

How has your experience with R&I helped prepare you for your current role?

By exposing me to the research process first hand professionally, while still in college, it gave me the tools, perspective, and perseverance needed for that type of work early on and opened those doors down the road. I can easily now boast five years working in some kind of function related to research for product development since graduating; this easily puts me on top of the list when trying to apply and perform those kinds of jobs. 

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

There were two main ones I worked on: one was a project with W.S. Tyler, helping them make improvements to their machinery for looming steel. We designed a fixture for a vision inspection system, a sturdy rack to assist tensioning of the in-fed steel wire, as well as improvements to the loom frame and an embedded wheel to reduce wear and machine downtime.

I also worked on a project with Ryan Industrial Technologies. It was a prototype machine for proof-of-concept for an automated system to pressure injected heated topping asphalt to fill potholes. I designed the heated mixer, screw conveyor, and hydraulic injection head assembly. Ryan IT handled the trailer and gantry design. I also reverse engineered, redesigned and recommissioned the manifolds and hydraulic power unit (HPU) with the owner and inventor of the application, Bill Ryan. We went to Princess Auto together to get all the fittings and size the hydraulic hoses needed to get it to work.

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

They were very responsive with my education, known for being very supportive of their students, and was rated highest in that time for student satisfaction.

“Never stop learning or seeking opportunities. Be hungry. Don’t settle for anything.”

Most memorable experience at NC?

Cramming for design projects late at night with peers to make deadlines. Eureka moments when programming PLCs to get an application to work a certain way and it actually works as intended. Long hours in the robotics and flexible manufacturing lab. Great debates with teachers on the realities of industry, technological trends, the job market and politics. Too much pizza and coffee just to get by. Oh and it was when the Harlem Shuffle was happening in schools everywhere before it went mainstream. 

A faculty member who influenced you?

They all did. At school and at Research & Innovation. For school I got a lot from Rick Baldin, Neil Walker, and Lois Johnson. I learned the most from them. At R&I it was Costa Aza, Rick Baldin, and Brian Mewhiney I learned the most from, as well as our clients Bill Ryan (Ryan IT) and Wilm Schulz (W.S.Tyler). Tremendous wisdom there collectively and not enough space here to describe well enough to give it justice.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Get ‘yer hands dirty. Take design outside of the office. Experiment, learn, and make decisions from hard data. Go out and see what heavy industry is like in the workforce first before making conclusions about your field. Also, seek a specialization or cross-over field knowledge. I’ve been pushing industrial automation technical studies part-time on the side for a few years now and is complementary to what I do. It has opened so many doors as well. It helps when collaborating in cross-disciplinary teams to understand these technologies, opportunities and their limits first hand.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

Never stop learning or seeking opportunities. Be hungry. Don’t settle for anything. 

Proudest achievement since graduating?

Getting this job, which is a culmination of everything I’ve worked on, studied for, and took extra training to get to.

Interests outside of work?

Brazilian Jiujitsu, new tech, guitar, politics, and of course my girlfriend lol. 

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

Stay sharp!

Anything else you want to say?

I’m grateful for the experiences NC and R&I have provided me, which helped ready me for where I am today. Cheers guys.

  


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Ursula Susunaga

 

Ursula Susunaga received an Advanced Diploma in Mechanical Engineering Technology from Niagara College in 2014 and spent a year as Research Assistant with Research & Innovation during her last year of studies. She went on to earn a Bachelor’s Degree in Mechanical Engineering from Lakehead University in 2016. She accepted a role that same year with PIA Automation Canada Inc. (Toronto), first in Applications Engineering and currently in Project Engineering and Support

Tell us about where you work:

PIA Automation is a global group of companies that offer complex and efficient solutions in automation. We have facilities in China, Germany, Austria, USA, and Canada. At PIA Canada we develop and manufacture customized assembly, measurement and testing systems for the automotive Industry (mostly in powertrain and e-mobility).

Describe your role and what you like about it:

As Project Engineering and Support, my current job requires me to support project managers on incoming material status, assembly status, customer parts status and running machine test parts. With this new position, I had the opportunity to go as an on-site supervisor for the installation and commissioning of one of our assembly lines in Mexico. I was responsible for solving any issues that presented themselves as we started to run parts through the line and assigning the correct resource to the different tasks that we had to handle day-by-day. Speaking Spanish was a positive advantage as I helped my team communicate with our Mexican customers and vice versa.

How has your Research & Innovation experience helped you prepare for your current role?

R&I introduced me to the world of an integrator, which is responsible for providing a turnkey solution from combining several subsystems to work together as one large system. 

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

I had the opportunity to work on a project with W.S. Tyler in St. Catharines to automate one of their loom machines. In this project, I had to analyze the process and try to replicate it with an automated system. We simulated the process by adding a robot to the cell. After thorough analysis, it was determined that their output of mesh screens would increase if they invested in automating the stations. It was then when W.S. Tyler decided to go forward and invest half a million dollars on this project.

 

“Keep up the hard work; it will pay off a little later in life. Don’t give up!”

 

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

Niagara College seemed a good school to prepare me, not only with hands-on experiences but also with the right knowledge to enter the workforce.

Most memorable experience at NC?

Being able to design, from scratch, a log splitter for my last year’s final project.

A faculty member who influenced you?

Professors Neil Walker and Rick Baldin.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Keep up the hard work; it will pay off a little later in life. Don’t give up!

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

I’ve learned that school teaches you about deadlines and hard work. It gives you the bases so you can then solve problems on your own. But, in reality, you don’t stop learning after school; every day is a new day, new project, new problem, and it is up to you to find the resources to make it work.

Proudest achievement since graduating?

After graduating from college, I decided to go to Lakehead University to finish my Mechanical Engineering Degree. Now, I am a registered EIT. I have passed my ethics exam and now I’m just waiting to achieve my required work experience so I can get my P.Eng designation.

What are your interests outside of work?

Outside of work, I like to dance and run by the water (especially in the summer).

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

Believe in yourself. You are enough. 

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Jon Weber

 

Jon Weber is a 2016 graduate of Niagara College’s Culinary Innovation and Food Technology program and worked for two and a half years as a Research and Sensory Assistant with R&I’s Canadian Food & Wine Institute Innovation Centre. For the past two years, Jon has worked as the National Sales Manager/Partner with Wholly Veggie!, a Toronto-based company that makes vegan and vegetarian food products.

Tell us a little about where you work:

Wholly Veggie is on a mission to get vegetables on peoples’ plates. Our goal is to provide convenient and easy ways for consumers to eat healthy, without compromising on taste and quality. Wholly Veggie is now found in stores across Canada and Target stores throughout the United States.

Describe your role as National Sales Manager/Partner:

The function of my title and my day-to-day can often be two very different things. My primary focus is to maintain activities of the Wholly Veggie! brand at the store level. This means managing a team of sales and marketing folks that provide boots on the ground support for the promotion and/or introduction of Wholly Veggie products. I am continuously hunting for new business this is done nationally and internationally and includes meeting with a number of prospect retailers/foodservice partners to the planning and execution of tradeshows. Behind the scenes, I work closely with our operations team to ensure successful delivery of orders, assist in managing the launch of new products and work with a team of creatives who help build the beautiful brand you get to see on the shelf and in the media.

What are types of things have you been up to since graduating?

I started as an R&D Intern with Daiya Foods. This was a great learning opportunity both academically and personally; I worked with a team of science enthusiasts and received my first taste of a corporate environment. I then shifted to be an R&D Technologist and Head of Sales (Herbaland Brand) for Herbaland Naturals, to eventually leading a team to help create the Herbaland brand you see now.

How has your experience with R&I helped prepare you for your current role?

Product Diversity, networking, training, and mentorship from staff and industry professionals

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

The Vineland Project. This was an in-depth sensory panel conducted over a weeks period. We invited panellists in over a period of five days to taste a number of different varieties of sweet potatoes. The foods were prepared under different conditions in the search of finding the perfect crop! I was able to carry these skills over to all my employers following my graduation. 

 

“Embrace and take advantage of every minute. It goes fast and there’s a bank of knowledge and experience sitting there at your finger tips … just ask.”

 

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

I originally wanted to be a chef but knew I wanted to better understand where my ingredients came from, how they got there and why ingredients interact the way they do when introduced to different environments. Niagara offered a unique program offering both culinary and food sciences.

Faculty members who influenced you?

Where to start?: Amy Proulx, Ted Reader, Sunan Wang, Gary Torraville, Sarah Scott, Sam Seaver, Dave Gibson, Jim McLean, Sabjit Bamrah.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Embrace and take advantage of every minute. It goes fast and there’s a bank of knowledge and experience sitting there at your fingertips…just ask.

Best experience at NC?

There can’t be just one. The wonderful team at Benchmark, the awesome professors, great facilities, and breaking into song with my classmates singing Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” before Regulations Class. I’d do it all again!

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

I’ve learned to work hard, stay persistent, and trust your gut. It’s a big bad world out there and you’ll have your ups and downs; but if you set goals and don’t give up, the world is full of opportunities. They’ll come from anywhere, and they’ll come to you.

Proudest achievement since graduating:

Helping build a brand (Wholly Veggie!) from zero to over 1,500 stores across North America.

Interests outside of work?

Fitness, food, travel, reading and social networking.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

No matter where you are, have fun; life is busy and complicated so make sure you’re doing something you enjoy.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Jonathan Pinchbeck

 

Jonathan Pinchbeck, C.E.T. is a 2013 graduate of Niagara College’s Mechanical Engineering Technology program and spent one year with Research & Innovation as a Research Assistant. Since April 2018, Jonathan as headed up the R&D at Deville Technologies in Ville St. Laurent, Quebec, a designer of high-capacity industrial food cutting systems.

Tell us about where you work:

Currently, I’m working for Deville Technologies in Ville St-Laurent, QC near Montreal. It is a Canadian company more than 25-years strong. The company designs and sells automated high-capacity industrial food cutting systems (shredding, grating, portioning, dicing, secondary dosing, conveyance) at rates of up to six tons/hr per process line (some clients have multiple lines). Our client base is in Canada, the US, and Europe for a variety of products (dairy, fruit, and vegetable, meats).

Describe your role and what you like about it:

As Deville’s R&D Technologist, I’m mainly responsible for researching, designing, and testing prototype machinery. I also help grow the department (currently two people: lab tech and myself), curate and build intellectual property, manage progress of R&D projects, help to increase our testing capability, investigate new components and building materials, develop pilot plants and processes, test rig design and automation, as well as help manage the tax credit process.

We’ve currently launched a machine to market that can successfully shred Edam cheese at high rates. I was directly involved in the shred chamber design and performance analysis of the machine. I also helped develop some new testing equipment to analyze force and friction in real-time. I’ve got a few game-changer technologies on the go right now that aren’t market-ready yet. Still hush-hush.

Please give us an idea of what types of related things you’ve been doing since graduating.

My first job after graduating was working as a machine designer for a company in hydraulics and pneumatics and later as a junior project manager. Then I worked as an R&D Tech, Junior and then Senior Project Lead over a three-year period, driving projects to improve, develop, manufacture, and maintain commercial-scale rotisserie ovens used at major grocery deli counters worldwide. Then after working as a Manufacturing Specialist at an architectural LED lighting company for a year I was approached by a headhunter working for Deville and it was a perfect fit.

How has your experience with R&I helped prepare you for your current role?

By exposing me to the research process first hand professionally, while still in college, it gave me the tools, perspective, and perseverance needed for that type of work early on and opened those doors down the road. I can easily now boast five years working in some kind of function related to research for product development since graduating; this easily puts me on top of the list when trying to apply and perform those kinds of jobs

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

There were two main ones I worked on: one was a project with W.S. Tyler, helping them make improvements to their machinery for looming steel. We designed a fixture for a vision inspection system, a sturdy rack to assist tensioning of the in-fed steel wire, as well as improvements to the loom frame and an embedded wheel to reduce wear and machine downtime.

I also worked on a project with Ryan Industrial Technologies. It was a prototype machine for proof-of-concept for an automated system to pressure injected heated topping asphalt to fill potholes. I designed the heated mixer, screw conveyor, and hydraulic injection head assembly. Ryan IT handled the trailer and gantry design. I also reverse engineered, redesigned and recommissioned the manifolds and hydraulic power unit (HPU) with the owner and inventor of the application, Bill Ryan. We went to Princess Auto together to get all the fittings and size the hydraulic hoses needed to get it to work.

“Never stop learning or seeking opportunities. Be hungry. Don’t settle for anything.”

 

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

They were very responsive with my education, known for being very supportive of their students, and was rated highest in that time for student satisfaction.

Most memorable experience at NC?

Cramming for design projects late at night with peers to make deadlines. Eureka moments when programming PLCs to get an application to work a certain way and it actually works as intended. Long hours in the robotics and flexible manufacturing lab. Great debates with teachers on the realities of the industry, technological trends, the job market, and politics. Too much pizza and coffee just to get by. Oh, and it was when the Harlem Shuffle was happening in schools everywhere before it went mainstream.

A faculty member who influenced you?

They all did. At school and at Research & Innovation. For school, I got a lot from Rick Baldin, Neil Walker, and Lois Johnson. I learned the most from them. At R&I, it was Costa Aza, Rick Baldin, and Brian Mewhiney I learned the most from, as well as our clients Bill Ryan (Ryan IT) and Wilm Schulz (W.S.Tyler). Tremendous wisdom there collectively and not enough space here to describe well enough to give it justice.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Get ‘yer hands dirty. Take design outside of the office. Experiment, learn and make decisions from hard data. Go out and see what heavy industry is like in the workforce first before making conclusions about your field. Also, seek a specialization or cross-over field knowledge. I’ve been pushing industrial automation technical studies part-time on the side for a few years now and is complementary to what I do. It has opened so many doors as well. It helps when collaborating in cross-disciplinary teams to understand these technologies, opportunities and their limits first hand.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

Never stop learning or seeking opportunities. Be hungry. Don’t settle for anything.

Proudest achievement since graduating?

Getting this job, which is a culmination of everything I’ve worked on, studied for, and took extra training to get to.

Interests outside of work?

Brazilian Jiujitsu, new tech, guitar, politics, and of course my girlfriend lol.

If you could have a billboard message seen by many, what would it say?

Stay sharp!

Anything else you want to say?

I’m grateful for the experiences NC and R&I have provided me, which helped ready me for where I am today. Cheers guys.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Adriann Knight

 

Adriann Knight graduated in 2017 from the Bachelor of Business Administration (International Commerce and Global Development) program. She spent six months as a research assistant for Research & Innovation’s Business & Commercialization team. Adriann is now employed as a business information officer for the City of St. Catharines.

Tell us about where you work:

I work at the St. Catharines Enterprise Centre – a partnership between the City of St. Catharines and the Ministry of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade. We provide small businesses and entrepreneurs assistance to start, grow, and succeed in business. We offer seminars on various small business topics, help them access financing through business plan revisions and facilitate events and one-on-one consultations.

Describe your role and what you like about it:

I’m truly blessed in my role. I get to meet talented individuals who have a dream to start their own business. I love being able to help them navigate the rules and regulations as they’re starting and being a resource for them to lean on when they have questions and concerns. It’s exciting to watch them grow and hire. Looking at just downtown St. Catharines there are a few businesses that I worked with closely and seeing them succeed is the highlight of my role! I’ve also had the chance to work with clients on crafting their pitches for the 1Awards by FirstOntario, as well as the Ignite Pitch Series by GNCC (Greater Niagara Chamber of Commerce).

Please give us an idea of what types of related things you’ve been doing prior to your current position:

Just after graduating, I returned to work at the Niagara Region. I had taken a break from studies to work there full time in 2015/2016 with their Economic Development department. Upon graduating, I returned to work with the Planning Department to work on the Niagara Employment Inventory data set. I actually use this data set a lot for my current work, to help entrepreneurs understand the competitive landscape in Niagara for their products/services.

How has your R&I experience helped you prepare for your current role?

One of the seminars that I facilitate is Market Research. My main role at R&I was in drafting client surveys and conducting interviews. I now help my clients work through Market Research and draft client surveys as a crucial step into validating and growing their businesses.

Please describe a memorable research project you were involved with at R&I:

I really enjoyed being a part of creating the Course-Based Research Report. I had the opportunity to speak with business owners and students on the value of these projects. I guess you can say that is where my passion for working with local businesses started to grow. I was able to learn about their needs and struggles; this has helped me in my current role. I’m now better able to advise my clients.

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

I had the opportunity to move to Ottawa but chose to stay in Niagara. I wanted to be a part of the growth and changes that are happening here. Niagara College also offered the degree program, allowing me to complete a degree in a setting that had smaller classroom sizes and the opportunity to study abroad. During my degree, I completed a co-op placement at the Ecuadorian-Canadian Chamber of Commerce in Guayaquil, Ecuador. I studied for two semesters in Guayaquil at UEES and then one semester in Lima, Peru at USIL.

“Work experience and life experience will help set you apart from your competition.”

Most memorable experience at NC?

Studying abroad. You learn so much about yourself when you take the leap to live in a country where you don’t speak the language. My time in Ecuador and Peru will always stay with me. I still speak to quite a few friends from South America, and have even used the Spanish that I learned in my current role. To be able to immerse yourself into a new culture, plus receive financial assistance from Niagara College to do so, was a dream come true.

Were there any faculty members who influenced you?

I honestly can say that every professor with whom I had an interaction, along with administration staff, shaped who I am today. From Eliza Lister in administration to Maxine Semple, for encouraging me to go abroad, to Jeff Sinclair (who now works at the Niagara Region) for recommending me to apply to work at the Region. Dr. Dawit Eshetu, who had so much belief in my abilities to succeed and was always there to help; David Pastirik, who always found time to listen to his students and their struggles; to Dr. Phil Wessels, for always answering my accounting questions. The list goes on. The staff is so dedicated to you succeeding!

A mentor at R&I?

Neil Wilkinson was a wonderful mentor during my placement! He has a brilliant mind and it was a privilege to learn from him!

What advice would you impart to current research students or future alumni?

Get yourself out there. Learn about all the opportunities you have available to you and go for them! Work experience and life experience will help set you apart from your competition. Talk to your professors – they truly want to see you succeed and are always happy to help!

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

Do as much as you can while you’re in school to get both work and life experiences. This will help you not only find your true passion but help you grow your network, and make you an attractive hire. Be humble, patient, and always open to learning new things.

Proudest achievement since graduating:

A program I coordinated recently saw 60 new businesses and over 100 jobs started across Niagara. Knowing that in some way I helped these businesses start and hire has been my proudest moment.

What are your interests outside of work?

I love riding my bike, the yoga studio, supporting our local wineries, and spending time with my friends and family.

If you could have a billboard message that would be seen by many, what would it say?

Wow this is a hard one… I think I will steal something that a hockey legend by the name of Wayne Gretzky once said: “You miss 100% of the shots you don’t take.” You have to put yourself out there and try; if you don’t, you’ll miss out on opportunities every time.

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.

Where Are They Now?: Justin Vigneux

 

Justin Vigneux graduated from Niagara College’s Renewable Energy Technician program in 2013. He spent one year with the Research &Innovation division as a Research Assistant during his studies. After working in the wind turbine field, he started his current position as a Wind Turbine Technician in 2018 with Boralex Inc., a renewable energy power production company. 

Tell us about where you work:

I currently work for Boralex Inc. (in Tilbury, Ontario) an energy production company. We own and operate power production facilities across Canada, France and New York State in all different forms of fuel sources. We operate wind, solar, hydro and biomass power generation facilities.

Describe your role and what you like about it:

We have just taken over the maintenance contract from the manufacturer and we are the first wind farm for Boralex to do this in all of Canada. In a sense, we are the guinea pigs in getting ready for the take-over of the maintenance contracts for all of our wind farms in Canada. This is especially cool for me because I like being able to participate in the improvement processes for paving the way for all of the other wind farms.

Please give us an idea of what types of related things you’ve been doing prior to your current position:

I previously worked for a wind turbine manufacturer that is German-based. I was the first full-time Technical Trainer to be employed here in Canada. I was responsible for travelling to Germany for my own training then travelling across Canada to deliver training to over 200 technicians. I have also managed the service operations of a wind farm.

How has your R&I experience helped you prepare for your current role?

The experience has helped me a lot in all of my positions since graduating from Niagara College. It was the first chance that I had to experience project-based employment where we had to sit and meet on a regular basis to keep everyone on the team up-to-date on the things we were working on. It also introduced me to things like budgeting, deadlines and experimental troubleshooting.

A memorable applied research project during your time at R&I?

I assisted very briefly with the Papernuts project on an electrical assembly perspective while working with Brian Mewhiney (professor and Research Faculty Lead).

What led you to Niagara College in the first place?

I was not enjoying my employment at the time and wanted to go to school for something technical but wasn’t sure what for. My brother had recently met with a career counsellor at NC and they had enthralled him with this new exciting program being offered for the first time. Living in Niagara Falls, NC was an obvious choice for me.

 

“I like being able to participate in the improvement processes for paving the way for all of the other wind farms.

 

Most memorable experience at NC?

I would have to say that my most memorable experience at NC was working with the other students in my program; we have made a strong bond and a friendship that will last a long time.

Proudest achievement since graduating:

My proudest achievement since graduating was getting to be a part of the Niagara Region Wind Farm Commissioning, as this was, during the time, the erection of Canada’s largest wind turbines.

Any faculty members or research leads who influenced you?

Absolutely, I enjoyed working with all the faculty involved with R&I but specifically, I worked the closest with Brian Mewhiney, Costa Aza, Wing Pak, and Gary Dolch.

What advice would you impart on current research students or future alumni?

Enjoy your experience working with the industry partners; ask as many questions as you can and never stop learning.

After being in the workforce, what have you learned?

I have learned so much since graduating from college. Learning how to be a good teammate and a hard worker are some of the things that I value most in what I have learned since college.

What are your interests outside of work?

I had a young family when starting at NC – my daughter was less than a year-old when I started and now I have a second daughter who is four years old. I would say that being a good role model for my daughters and spending quality family time with them is my favourite thing to do.

If you could have a billboard message, what would it say?

Never act selfishly! Always think of our future generations!

 


» VIEW ALL PROFILES

Innovation in Action

Through applied research activities, Niagara College’s Research & Innovation division is preparing the workforce with the right know–how by providing an array of researcher expertise, supported by leading-edge facilities, technology and equipment. See how graduates and R&I alumni are applying their skills and knowledge in the real world.